The Best Sleep Position for Decreasing Acid Reflux

In this article, we explore the link between fatigue and GERD in depth. We also describe treatment options and when to see a doctor. Engaging in slow, deep breathing can be a great way to relax as you lie in bed waiting for sleep. Plus, Dr. Royce says, all that practice centering yourself can come in handy during labor and when raising children. Making (and sticking to) a bedtime ritual might seem too simple to help you get quality rest, but it signals to your body that it’s time to get to sleep, Dr. Boester says.

Nighttime reflux can lead to sleep disturbance and sleep disturbance may further aggravate GERD by prolonged acid contact time and heightened sensory perception. This may facilitate the occurrence of complicated GERD and decreased quality of life. However, the interplay between sleep problems and GERD is complex, and there are still relatively limited data on this issue. Further investigation of sleep-related GERD may identify common pathophysiological themes and new therapeutic targets.

GERD is a recurrent and chronic disease that does not resolve itself. If you are diagnosed with GERD, there are several methods of treatment which your doctor will discuss with you including behavioral modifications, medications, surgery, or a combination of methods. Over-the-counter medications may provide temporary relief but will not prevent symptoms from recurring.

If cutting carbs doesn’t help after about two weeks, try another tactic. High-fat foods can also cause problems.

The Secret of Sleeping Reflux Free

Reflux happens because the LES is too weak or relaxed to close properly, thus allowing for the stomach acid to backup back to the esophagus. Researchers obtained data from a patient-reported survey conducted in 2006 among the general U.S. population. Respondents who experienced GERD symptoms at least twice in the past month were categorized as GERD patients and were sub-classified into groups based on nighttime symptoms and sleep difficulties. Nighttime GERD symptoms interfere with patients falling and staying asleep, and result in considerable economic burden and reduction in health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

But surgery isn’t always a complete solution. Some people still wind up needing medication afterwards.

Sleeplessness poses a serious health problem. In addition to the physical and mental effects that stem from lack of sleep, people who experience nocturnal GERD are at greater risk for some of the worst complications of the disease, including erosive esophagitis, dyspepsia, and esophageal cancer. The symptoms of GERD, such as coughing and choking, tend to worsen when you are lying down or attempting to sleep. The backflow of acid from the stomach into the esophagus can reach as high as your throat and larynx, causing you to experience a coughing or choking sensation.

Another holds that left-side sleeping keeps the junction between stomach and esophagus above the level of gastric acid. THE FACTS For people with chronic heartburn, restful sleep is no easy feat.

This is a problem because the length or duration of the acid mucosal contact facilitates the back diffusion of hydrogen ions into the esophageal mucosa, which causes esophageal injury. There are substantial data, consequently, to suggest that nighttime reflux is the primary cause of the complications of gastroesophageal reflux (ie, esophagitis) and respiratory complications such as chronic cough, wheezing, and exacerbation of bronchial asthma.

stomach acid and sleep

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