Coronary heart disease

Although chest pain or pressure is the most common symptom of a heart attack, heart attack victims may experience a diversity of symptoms. The following list describes the symptoms of heart attack in more detail. Chest pain is almost always considered an emergency. Aside from heart attacks, pulmonary embolus (blood clot in the lung) and aortic dissection or tear can be fatal causes of chest pain. Classic pain from a heart attack is described as chest pressure or tightness with radiation of the pain to the jaw and down the arm, accompanied by shortness of breath or sweating.

You may feel nauseous or generally unwell while experiencing other heart attack symptoms. You may feel pain, heaviness, tightness pressure or a crushing sensation in the centre of your chest.

But knowing whether the pain is a true warning sign of heart attack or a bout of indigestion may not always be obvious. You’re never too young or too healthy to have a heart attack.

In contrast, heart attacks are frequently life threatening. If there is any doubt in your mind as to whether you or someone you are with has symptoms indicating heartburn or heart attack, you should call 911 immediately to be transported to an emergency department for medical treatment. It is almost impossible to tell the difference between the symptoms of heartburn and heart attack for many people, especially if they experience symptoms of either for the first time. However, some people who have suffered from repeated episodes of heartburn, or have survived a heart attack, often can tell the difference between the two conditions simply by theirs symptoms, some of which are listed.

I’d only just turned 50. I’m fit and active, I eat well, I don’t smoke. I have healthy cholesterol levels, normal blood pressure. No diabetes, no family history of early heart disease – no risk factors. According to the NHS, it’s the overall pattern of symptoms that helps to determine whether you are having a heart attack.

According to statistics from the Heart Foundation, 435,000 American women have heart attacks annually and 267,000 die from them. Of these deaths, 83,000 are in women under age 65; 35,000 are in women under 55. Hiatal hernia also causes symptoms of discomfort when it is associated with a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is characterized by regurgitation of stomach acids and digestive enzymes into the esophagus through a weakened sphincter that is supposed to act as a one-way valve between the esophagus and stomach. Hiatal hernia is thought to contribute to the weakening of this sphincter muscle.

This means the part of the heart supplied by that artery is starved of oxygen-rich blood, and the muscle is at risk of dying without medical help. The sooner the treatment, the more muscle you can save. The “silent” in a silent heart attack is the complicating factor-often, women don’t realize they’re experiencing a medical emergency.

Heart attacks can be fatal, so it is important to recognize when a spike or drop in blood pressure points to a heart attack and which other symptoms to look for. The symptoms of a heart attack can also be similar to indigestion. For example, they may include a feeling of heaviness in your chest, a stomach ache or heartburn. Gas pain in the chest is usually not a cause for concern, though it can lead to pressure or discomfort.

A feeling of being generally unwell or like you are coming down with an illness can accompany a heart attack. This can be described as fatigue or even lightheadedness, with or without fainting. Some people will experience severe anxiety or panic during the heart attack.

Symptoms of heart disease include chest pain and shortness of breath. Explore heart disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. As mentioned previously, some people experiencing a heart attack can have belching and burping and describe a feeling of indigestion.

indigestion heart attack warning

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